• Wow you don’t know how to do that? #TNSHRM14

    10629566_687334284706714_6248169064907363735_nWe have come to the conclusion that yes there is hope for greater social media adoption in HR. From the social media lounge of the TNSHRM14 conference we have seen greater interest, better questions and increased desire to understand social media and how to use it as an HR tool. The attendees are asking more sophisticated questions demonstrating a better understanding or and willingness to explore social media for engagement.

    Last year the TNSHRM Social Media Pit crew led 2 concurrent sessions on social media and we only had 6 attendees come to the sessions; 5 in one, and 1 in the other. This year we also led 2 breakout sessions; Social Media, Why Should I Care? and Using Social Media at Work (Engagement) and we had 400% more attendance which were well attended even with increased competition and some negative comments from other sessions. We debunked many of those statements with great presentations and tactical information.

    We are proud of our attendees because they asked more questions about specific social platforms and strategies. They are past the whole “how do I tweet?” thing.  Now they want to know how do I use Twitter, Facebook, Instagram for engagement. They wanted to know drive the conversation to employees and perspective employees via the various social media networks. They asked questions about the demographics of each network so they can figure the best plan of action for their company.

    This is refreshing because the attendees are ready to get social. The old way of doing things is dead. Now HR is ready to become a major player in the social media game. We are finally catching up to the earlier adopters of social and it feels good.

    So the take away from this for conference planners is thus.  We must continue to include training and education on social media as part of HR conferences. While there is more interest and more activity in social media as an HR tool the training and support must continue.  There are still those out there who are fear mongering and wanting to shut down social media“ as an HR tool.  Carry on!

    Written by Chris Fields and Dave Ryan

     
  • We can make SHRM Better and Stronger

    SHRM Advice day– it sounds like a sale or something.  I would like to thank the Cynical Girl for the invite to contribute to this concept. This is a BIG topic and like so many of the other HR bloggers out there, I have an opinion about most everything.  This is what it is… an opinion no more.

    Out of the box I need to say that I am a big supporter of the Society of Human Resource Management a.k.a. SHRM.  I have been involved with a local chapter for many years. I have been involved with the Illinois State Council of SHRM, and I have attended more than my fair share of SHRM events.  I can honestly say I know SHRM.   But when asked what could they do better, I have some thoughts.

    I am not a really big picture guy,  I tend to focus on things that can be done easily and can affect change in short order. You might call it low hanging fruit, from a trench HR guy.

    Let me also say I do not claim ownership of these improvement I am listing. The concepts have been around for a long time. I subscribe to them, and think they are things that Duke Street should act on quickly.

    Share the names and contact information of at-large members with the State Councils and Local Chapters. We are all on the same team. SHRM want all organizations to  grow membership, well this would be a great group to target.  I don’t know all the behind the scenes details but I know that friction remains between the National and the state and local organizations about at-large members.

    Coordinate/Facilitate/Help State Councils share information about events,  while helping promote state conferences.  Again, we are not the competition.  State Councils are challenged to put on good conferences each year.  We could learn more from one and other. There are many of us who have fostered relationships with folks in other states and around the country.  We share information, talk about sessions, speakers, content, venues etc.   Why not help us out with this, coordinate this and exhibit some leadership.  We are on the same team.

    This is a really a subset of the second item.  Create a National Speaker Database for use by all local chapter and state councils.  This would allow  State Councils and local chapters to coordinate information and not feel like they were on their own.  This once was framed this way by Matt Stollack – create a Yelp like database for SHRM speakers at all level. That sums up this concept.

    Make free Wi-Fi available at all SHRM National events!  Nuff said!

    That’s my take on some improvements that SHRM could make that would go a long way toward improving the relationships with the organizations up and down the line.

    No argument , I am a supporter through and through, but I do believe if the mothership acted on my suggestions thing would improve at all levels.

     

     
  • SHRM, HRevolution, ERE, HRTech…Why do you go?

    Three time attendees recognized at HRevolutioin

    In this post I will be making reference and linking over to my project social partner Laura Schroeder; like we have both done a number of times.  But with today’s post Laura and I are going to add new friend and blogger to our little project social project link-fest.  For those of you who don’t know her, please say hello to  Lyn Hoyt (from twitter @designtwit) and her blog site http://hrbaconhut.com/content/.  Lyn will be linking back and forth with Laura and I now and then. So onto today’s post…

    Having recently returned from HRevolution this subject is top of mind for me.  Over the past few years I have had to opportunity and good fortune to attend a number of conferences.   Many of these my employer has paid for, and for that I am most thankful.  I have attended some other SHRM events, and while I did not have to pay to attend, on some occasions, I have committed to working and I have paid to get myself there or for meals or other incidentals.  And in the last case such as HRevolution, I paid my own (airfare, lodging, conference fee and incidentals) way to be there.

    At the various events I have attended I often encounter a number of people who seem to be in attendance at virtually every event. I look at this and I am left with more questions than answers.  I question this not to be mean or rude – simply just out of curiosity.  I understand that some of the folks who morph between attendee and participant are there to promote themselves, besides being an attendee; and I get that.

    While there are other folks who are in attendance and never present, but seem to know and hang with all of the ”A” players.

    And then there’s my group those of us that show occasionally at some of the events and know many of the folks.

    Now that I have identified the groups, I am still curious to understand what it is that drives each of these groups. I have my own reasons for attending different events. I attend for theses reasons:

    • To obtain recertification credits for my SHRM designation
    • To learn current thinking current legislative matters
    • To seek out creative solution to complex problems that I face
    • To understand better an organizations goals and objectives
    • To visit with old friends and make new ones
    • To travel to fun, exotic or just warm locations
    • To get away from the day to day grind and clear my head
    • To participate as a panelist or speak at the event

    That is my list – for now.  Why else do you spend time on the conference circuit or simply what drive you to attend an event?  I would love to hear from anyone who attends! For a couple  more looks at the conference circuit check out Laura here – and Lyn here.