• The Unconference Lives

    This post is targeted to all of the folks in the HR Echo Chamber.  (The line is we talk to ourselves and no one else really listens).  Last week I personally had a minor epiphany. It had to do with the unconference.  While this  group of Human Resource internet aficionados, here in the chamber,  did not invent or does not own the unconference, we certainly do advocate for its use and adoption, especially guys like Bill Boorman.

    Within the span of less than a week, I ran into the unconference on two different planes.  As a registered/certified USA Hockey Referee I must annually attend a clinic (this is suppose to facilitate my competency as an official).  For as long as I can remember, how they disseminate information is in the classic lecture style – with power point.

    Opening remarks at HREvolution 2012

    This year (drum roll please) the instructor said I am going to do something different.  He said I have a list of some things I would like to discuss, but I want your involvement and input. He said, further, I would like to talk about any concerns or issues that you guys might want to bring up. Holy Cow – sounds like an unconference to me.   So that’s what we did, he was a great facilitator which lead to a lot of information being shared. Kudos to USA Hockey.

    Six days later, my son who was in Chicago attended an event at Columbia College. It was called The Creative Unconference.  At this event people just talked there were no presentation or power point. That sound like an event where you might find his dad and his HR buddies. Wow!

    So in the span of less than a week, I was touched twice by the unconfernce.  Wow maybe we are helping to move the ball forward!  Viva la HREvolution – Vival la TruConferences.

     
  • Talk Time An Ohio SHRM Takeaway

    Bill Boorman (in the tie died shirt) making his point at OHSHRM

    At the end of day two of the Ohio SHRM conference, I am a little wiser than I was when I arrived.  People attend conferences for a number of reasons, some more honorable than other reasons. But regardless of the reason you can not sit through these sessions and not take something away. My big takeaway is this. Implementation is hard.   I suppose you could use change interchangeably with implementation, as they are generally one in the same.

    At the typically conference you hear about how others have done it, You hear about why you need to do it.   You can learn all of the techniques that have worked in the past, but ultimately YOU have to go do it in your organization. Usually whatever it is, no one else has any interest in getting it done or helping you do it.

    Well today I got a pretty good tip from Bill Boor man on how to get things done.  Bill’s presentation was on global HR, but one thing he talked about must be a universal concept.  During Bill’s program he discussed how HR wasn’t willing to put the TALK TIME into things.

    Talk time is when you sit down with someone and look them in the eye and tell them what you are feeling and thinking.  By and large this needs to be done with all of the staff – they get talk time.   Technology is making it really easy no to grant talk time, or how we can come up with other ways of communicating a message without talk time.

    I guess it seems elementary, but it isn’t. Many of the conversations are difficult. They involve tough subjects, and matters that people don’t want to hear.  These conversations are going to make more work for the employee. It is going to make the employee feel less positive about the organization because of what you are telling them. Nobody wants to hear it, nobody want to deliver the message. So we choose to communicate in way that is less confrontation – but yet removes the human element.

    When I send an email it does not show my facial expression.  When you leave a voicemail you can’t pat someone on the back.  If you use an intermediary they just say, so and so told me to tell you.

    Talk time will make implementation easier. We need to give more talk time and we need to get more talk time. I am going to work on this – thanks Bill!